Brew Day: Brown Eye Woke 3.0

This will be our third iteration of Brown Eye Woke, it’s been probably our best received beer since we started brewing. Though a friend of ours made a comment that rang pretty true in regards to this beer: it is pretty one note. This is actually very true. We then decided that we should switch the grain bill up and tweak the recipe just a bit. This led to two things: a bit of extra grain (1 pound extra, no big deal really) and the removal of biscuit malt. We removed biscuit in order to add Chocolate malt and a bit of C-40.

The goal was to add a bit of body to the beer and make the coffee complement the base malts instead of taking it over. Chocolate malt was mainly for color as we only used a half pound. Based off the initial tasting of the wort and the higher original gravity I think we are on the right track.

Grain Bill:
8#           Maris Otter
.8#          Victory
.8#          Brown
.75#       Special Roast
.75#       C-40
.5#          Chocolate Malt

Hops:
.75 oz    East Kent Golding (45 minute addition)
.75 oz    East Kent Golding (15 minute addition)

Yeast:
WLP002 – English Ale Yeast

Other:
Yeast Energizer @ 15 minutes
Whirlfloc            @ 15 minutes

Mash:
151F                       60 Minutes

Boil:
60 Minutes

Estimated OG:                  Actual OG:
1.056                                     1.054

Estimated FG:
1.008

Estimated ABV:
6.2%

We started up by heating our sparge water to 160F to keep the mash temperature at 151F during the full hour. It spiked up to 151.7F for a few minutes and then went down to 151F and stayed there for the remainder. I figure this was because of the weather outside. It was 101F while we under our canopy and the clouds kept coming in and out, pretty strange day in that regard. We ended up mashing in a little too much water and had about 7.8 gallons in the kettle instead of 7.5, because of this we missed our target OG by .002 points. I should’ve known to boil for a bit longer but it didn’t even occur to me at the time, call it heat exhaustion.

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Mashing out, color and smell on point so far.

First thing that pops to me during the mash out is the color of the wort. Definitely more in line with what the color of a brown ale should be, especially after the 2nd batch was a little on the light side. The aroma coming from the kettle was remarkable as well; nutty, toasty, and caramel/chocolate. It’s a step in the right direction and hopefully the end result is a bit bolder.

We got the boil rolling pretty quickly and added our hops at the scheduled times. We opted against the hop spider for this specific batch because we only used 1.5 ounces of hops. I whirlpooled a little during the transfer through the plate chiller and it got a little clogged but we fixed that issue quickly. We cooled it from 210F to 85F in about 4 minutes. We weren’t happy with the fact we still had to drop the temp 17+ degrees, but it was hot outside so we didn’t want to do a second pass. We threw the carboy in the fridge and cooled it to 68F in about 3 hours.

We pitched our yeast, got everything working in the fermentation chamber and sealed her up. Once the beer has fermented completely we are going to add coffee, as always. This time we are using Mostra coffee. The specific bean being used is Costa Rica Tres Rios Aguas Claras single origin. Mostra describes it as Bordeaux wine, chocolate, and wet wood.  I think that will play very nicely with the base of this beer.

It’s been a while since we have experimented with our batches, so we decided to do exactly that with this one. We are going to siphon off 1 gallon once it has completely fermented and been infused with coffee we will then transfer it onto oak. We previously did something similar with a stout we brewed, we transferred that to a 1 gallon carboy with apple brandy soaked oak. Unfortunately, that batch got pretty oxidized because the bung blew off while I was on vacation. For this specific batch it is going to be just regular oak with no bourbon.  I’m thinking either American or Hungarian chips will be best for this beer.

As a side note, we got the results back from the Maltose Falcons home brewing competition. We didn’t place in either category, but we ranked pretty high with our Saison. We ended up with a 32, which is decent. The pale ale did not fare so well, it ended up with a 22. The pale ale was disappointing because it never rounded into what it was supposed to be. The hop flavor was very diminished, it wasn’t clear, and it never carbed up fully. While it is kind of a bummer, but we are going to continue improve and take home some ribbons eventually. Cheers.

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Battle of the Wokest

Stupid post title aside, this is actually kind of an important post. We have a problem sometimes with not saving beers to do side by side comparisons from one batch to the next. Granted, not all styles age very gracefully so you have to pick and choose which to save and which to consume fresh, but I digress.

I saved a bottle of Brown Eye Woke batch 1 for specifically this purpose. I want to see how it’s holding up to the test of time (7 months) and how similar or different batch 2 may be. We used a different type of coffee but the grain bill was exactly the same. Moving forward, let’s get started!

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Batch 1 on the left, batch 2 on the right

Appearance: You can see right away the batch 2 is much lighter. I touched upon this a bit in my previous post when going over the brew day. I’m still not sure why the difference, I’m assuming a specialty grain was either given in a smaller quantity or given the wrong one entirely. A much bigger head on the batch 1 bottle, which is strange — both were carbonated at the same volume. I think a good color would be somewhere in between the two. We will make the necessary adjustments.

Aroma: I’ll just go ahead and throw this out there now. Batch 1 has completely fallen off. Very light coffee smell with a slightly metallic twang at the end. Batch 2 on the other had smells great! Heavy coffee with an amaretto like nuttiness rounding it out. I get some decent malt character as well, a slight roasted chocolate smell.

Body: Pretty similar between the two of these. Batch 2 has the better body, but that could be due to the higher carbonation level of Batch 1. Very similar though, very drinkable but not exactly thin. I’d say for a brown the body is right where it needs to be — medium.

Taste: Same grain bill, same yeast, different coffee. Things should be pretty similar right? Not really. Batch 1 is noticeably worse at this stage. The coffee has completely fallen off and the aftertaste went from a hazelnut/walnut finish to a iron like flavor. Very disappointing ending to my favorite batch from last year. Batch 2 though… even better than batch 1 was fresh. Intense coffee taste on the front with a roasted malt backbone to round it out. It has a sweet-amaretto like flavor in there as well. Much more complex than the first batch and already better.

Overall: I’m curious to see how batch 2 ages considering batch 1 tanked pretty hard in a relatively short amount of time. If batch 2 suffers the same fate we may have refine how we add our coffee. I know coffee tends to fade over time, but this is a relatively fast drop off. We normally dry bean, but maybe cold brew is the correct way to go.

Batch 2 is the clear winner right now, but in reality I think the real winner was us. Getting to compare and contrast previous iterations of the beer we’ve created is pretty special.

We will make sure to do a batch 2 vs. batch 3 comparison when the time comes.